German Reds – Don’t Worry About Pronouncing Them, Just Drink Them!

IMG_1497

After a quick break for lunch it was onto the second master class of the day down at the ABS Wines tasting day. Anne Krebiehl, Master of Wine, chaired the panel of winemakers made up of the great and the good of German red wine production. This was all about why German reds deserve their time in the spotlight!

I guess it’s fair enough to feel the need to run a session like that. Think of German wines, you naturally think of Riesling in the tall thin bottles. You don’t think of it as a hot bed of red wine production.

I’m lucky enough to have driven down the Deutsche Wein Strasse a couple of years back, so had a fair idea of the German reds. But again the beauty of master classes is get to listen to the winemakers themselves tell you what they think is the most important things to consider. So I sat back infront of my tasting glasses of Spätburgunder (German for Pinot Noir), Dornfelder, and Lemberger and let them take it away!

In a self-admitted German stereotype, they came heavily armed with statistics! In fairness they were pretty interesting. Did you know that over a third of German vine plantings are red grapes? And that Germany is the third largest Pinot Noir producer in the world? I didn’t!!

Germany has a great tradition of red wine production, but in the past it’s been tailored to the local market. Dornfelder was a crossing from the 1950s designed to get a grape that’ll ripen in the cool climate of German regions and give lots of deep red colour. The local market loves it, but does the rest of the world know about it? That’s the challenge now. Use the distinct and superb Pinot Noirs to get the world’s attention and then send in the Dornfelder and Lemberger.

Fingers crossed they’ll be on the shelves soon for us all to try even more!

Prost!

Mike

The panel of the master class were:

Anne Krebiehl MW

Konstantin Guntrum from Louis Guntrum in Rheinhessen

Alexander Stodden from Weingut Jean Stodden in Ahr

Rainer Schnaitmann from Schnaitmann in Württemburg


10 thoughts on “German Reds – Don’t Worry About Pronouncing Them, Just Drink Them!

  1. Lucky you! I grew up in Württemberg with vineyards and wine festivals aplenty, and I’m missing a good Trollinger, which is the grape we have been growing traditionally. I’m glad you enjoyed your day!

      1. Oh sweet memories … You really need to get to Stuttgart and the surrounding area to visit a Besenwirtschaft: the vineyard owners are legally entitled to clear out their barrels by running an inn for up to 4 months a year, which they do from their own homes. You are basically sitting in their living or dining room and consuming their wine, as well as home-cooked dishes, as if it was an inn. They’re called Besenwirtschaft, or ‘broom inn’ because they will hang up a broom outside their door to signal they’re open for business.
        http://www.besentermine.de/ gives you dates and addresses, in case you wanted to try it out 😉

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s