#NWTW Week 37: Malbec from Argentina

flags - argentina

Well after getting a bit of stick for having not stuck my neck outside Europe for a few months worth of choices, I’m following Ant’s example and going for another of those world classics; Argentinian Malbec.

I can almost hear Ant rolling his eyes, as I know this is one of his bogey wines. But I’m sorry mate, I don’t mind, it’s a great excuse for us to pop a steak on this weekend coming, and what more kicker do you need?

My picks for the week are:


Majestic

Gestos Malbec 2013 @ £7.49

Morrisons
Bodega Santa Ana Reserve Malbec @ £11.49

Sainsburys
TTD Morador Malbec @ £8.00

Spirited Wines
Cuatro Malbec 2011 @ £11.75

Vinmonopolet
Catena Malbec 2011 @ NOK 155

Happy hunting

Cheers

 

11 thoughts on “#NWTW Week 37: Malbec from Argentina

  1. johncstevens says:

    Timing couldn’t have been better with Malbec being the #newwinethisweek- it was the wife’s birthday on Thursday night and I had a table booked at the best steakhouse chain in London, Hawksmoor. As Mike’s been describing all week, the only real food match for Argie Malbec is a juicy fat steak.

    I know this isn’t a restaurant blog but for anyone who lives or visits London and hasn’t been to Hawksmoor, get yourself there sharpish-I’ve never eaten meat as good as here. The wine list at the new Knightsbridge venue is also spot on, with a Coravin section where you can buy Cos or Beaucastel by the glass!
    They also had a very reasonable Argentinian Malbec by the glass so I got stuck in to get the creative #NWTW juices flowing.

    The better half wouldn’t have been very impressed if I spent the whole night making notes on my phone so all I can remember is that it was from the Pulenta estate in Mendoza, was full and dark and went down a treat with the rib eye.

    The supermarket version I picked up was the 2013 Monteflores from M & S at £9.99.

    Monteflores is a Fairtrade wine producer and is at the forefront of Malbec production in Mendoza. This particular wine is made by a Frenchman called Matthieu Grassin who insists on ageing it for 6 months in French oak.

    The intense heat and sunshine they get in Argentina is apparent as soon as you pour this one-it’s very deep and very dark and it’s not hard to guess what character it’s going to show.

    The nose is all about dark fruit and a hint of leather. There’s plums, cherries and truffles all fighting for top billing. The palate’s very, very powerful and needs a carnivorous partner to balance it out. I tasted half a bottle without any food and then stumbled my way to the fridge to get some meat out quick! At 14.5% the power and heat is just too much on its own. Once the food reins it in, the tannins become less aggressive and the acidity comes through nicely. There’s a pleasant vanilla sweetness on the end that must be a result of the oak ageing.

    I can understand why Anthony has reservations about Argentinian Malbec. It works magically with steak but very little else. Without the meaty partner it’s just too damn powerful for its own good!

    A wine which needs to know its place! 6/10

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