#NWTW Week 11: Beaujolais from, well…Beaujolais!

France, Info For Beginners, New Wine This Week, Reds

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Yeah I know most people have heard of Beaujolais.  Have you spent much time drinking it though?  Or even made an effort to try the different areas in the AOC (that’s how the French call their controlled wine areas)?  Well hopefully over the next week we can all have a try of a few examples across the region.

Nice thing about Beaujolais is that you’re absolutely guaranteed to be able to pick one up in any shop you go in.  So as much as the below are the wines I’ll be going for, you’ll have the choice no matter where you go.

Majestic Wine
Georges DuBoeuf, Juliénas, Flower Label, 2009
£8.99

Morrison’s
Morrison’s Signature, Fleurie, 2012
£7.49

Sainsbury’s
Georges DuBoeuf, Brouilly, 2011
£9.49

Spirited Wines
Domaines des Billards, Saint-Amour, 2011
£14.42

Don’t worry about the labels, and all the random looking words in them.  I’ll explain all that over the week.  It’s easy enough once you’ve got one or two ideas in your head.  Trust me!

Cheers

17 thoughts on “#NWTW Week 11: Beaujolais from, well…Beaujolais!

  1. Ooh, I just saw this and now I’ve gotten myself two Cru Beaujolais to compare tonight: a Brouilly and a Julenias, roughly the same price. I always forget I like Beaujolais, so this was a good reminder to get some!

  2. Great choice guys for this week, a real under rated variety these days which has so much more to it than the once a year gimmick at the end of November (although I can’t help myself falling for it every year!)

    I wanted to go for a sturdier, full-bodied version so bought a bottle of 2010 Moulin-à-Vent, Vieilles Vignes, Domaine Thibault Liger-Belair from my local Lea & Sandeman in Chiswick for £21.75.

    This producer is better known for his Burgundy vineyards and ferments his Beaujolais in a similar way, rather than going for carbonic maceration. The Moulin-à-Vent region is synonymous with the more heavy duty Gamay, some of it even being aged in oak.

    The Burgundy style and the unfined/unfiltered process he adopts are blatantly obvious from the start- big, up front red currants and cranberries on the nose with that unmistakable earthy aroma.

    The palate is reasonably balanced and shows a touch of cinnamon with vegetal characteristics, but I think this wine would benefit from another few years cellaring. It opens up remarkably in the glass after 30 mins or so, therefore the future possibilities are enticing!

    I love how Burgundy-esque this wine is inclined to be (as would Anthony I hazard a guess!), and reckon this has got to be superb value wine from a Vosne-Romanée producer. 9/10

  3. I wish I could add to John’s positivity… But although my bottle wasn’t at all bad, it just wasn’t what I expected, or wanted, from Beaujolais:

    Julien Duport Cote de Brouilly 2010

    Quite a muscular nose of red cherry, bit of blackberry, a touch of dry herb and a salty-brinyness. Extremely dry with quite aggressive tannins… A bit lacking in acidity and very rustic… Not the bright fruit I was expecting… And hoping for. 6/10

    1. Funny you say that, I had exactly the same experience from the Julienas last night. The raspberry and cherry was there, but it was much more burnt crumble than fruit salad. Acidity was medium at best. Tannin was mercifully restrained by CM. I think there are times when I’m really happy when I get something i’m not expecting, but not convinced here 5/10

      The Morrison’s Signature Fleurie though was spot on though. Lovely fresh strawberry and raspberry, low in tannin, high end of medium acidity, went great with my red thai curry (made from scratch fyi!!!!). At £7.49 it’s the cheapest of the wines for me this week, and although not hugely complex, it does what it says on the tin! 7/10

  4. There’s something very interesting going on here; Beaujolais has moved on and we as consumers haven’t. I think we are all expecting the light, bright and fruity numbers that have been associated with the area historically but the winemakers have moved on!

    It seems to me that terroir is becoming increasingly important and apparent and we need to to raise our expectation and treat Beaujolais as the serious wine it really is.

    The lighter wines are still there at the cheaper end of the market but get into the Crus and above £15 and you are into serious wine territory.

  5. Absolutely loved the Chiroubles, but really got a mixed feeling about what the producers are trying to achieve here. The other wines were neither one thing nor the other. I giving a very respectable 7/10, but could have been so much more!

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